Posts tagged William Penn

Thoughts on Leadership (Part II)

These thoughts are not my own but what I compiled from Central Asian students answering a question about what THEY think good leadership is.  I haven’t had time to check to see if the quotes they took out of books or off the Internet are accurate, if my dear readers find one that is out of line, please comment.  I’ll be quick to make a correction. I write that caveat because I checked a quote several years ago that was supposedly a Kyrgyz proverb and it turned out to be classic Karl Marx.

First of all, leaders must be good orators. If you see the history of leadership you can see that each leader had a good oratorical talent that made people do things not with threats, but just with their speech.  We know Bobur, one of the famous Uzbek leaders, because he built up a great empire.  Thanks to his oratorical talent he had encouraged his army before the fight against India and won it, although the number of his soldiers was 20 times fewer than his enemies…I think Amir Temur as one of the great leaders.  He was also known as one of the best orators in his time.  He was the master of his work.  I mean, he knew in advance what would happen next from a situation.  Once when he was going to fight against soldiers he had few soldiers.  Then he made a good tactic by ordering soldiers to tie branch of trees to their horses. While riding horses with branch of trees toward enemies, the soldiers of Temur frightened enemies who saw dust from distance and thought the number of soldiers is larger than theirs.  Temur’s obstinacy gave him a chance to build p Temurids Empire.  There was a big fight between Mongols and him, called “Loy jangi” for Tashkent.  Although he lost the fight, thanks to his obstinacy, he was able to squeeze out Mongols from the city later.

Bill Gates “As we look ahead into the next century, leaders will be those who empower others.”

Motto: “Today you are a reader, tomorrow you are a leader.”

Marcus Aurelius – “Waste no more time arguing what a good leader should be.  Be one.”

George Patton “leaders are willing to make decisions.”

Lao Tzu “To lead the people, walk behind them.”

William Penn “No man is fit to command another who cannot command himself.”

Plato “The first and greatest victory is to conquer yourself; to be conquered by yourself is of all things most shameful and vile.”

Russian saying: “He who does not risk, will never drink champagne.”

Tamurlane “It is better to die than to kneel.”  “Power is justice.” Tamurlane awarded soldiers according to their service.

Kurtsy “Army without a commander is a body without a soul”

Thomas Jefferson “All management skills consist in the art to be fair.”

Carrie Ann Tajaran; “A good leader directs the path to success and let his followers use their own skills and knowledge in achieving it.”

Stephen Covey “Management is efficiency in climbing the ladder of success; leadership determines whether the ladder is leaning against the right wall.”

Friedrich Nietzsche “To do great things is difficult; but to command great things is more difficult.”

Famous Am. Business leader and writer Harold R.McAlindon “Do not follow where the path may lead. Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.”

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“Wisdom of Nations” – Animal Proverbs (Part II)

“The wisdom of nations lies in their proverbs, which are brief and pithy. Collect and learn them; they are notable measures of directions for human life; you have much in little; they save time in speaking; and upon occasion may be the fullest and safest answer.” William Penn

Proverbs about animals are taken from “Dictionary of English Proverbs, Sayings and Idioms in Russian, Kazakh and German” by Sakina Akmetova, published by Mektel in Almaty, 2009

“A good horse should be seldom spurred.” OR “Do not spur a willing horse.”

“A lazy sheep thinks its wool heavy.” Turkey (too much trouble to carry their own wool, lazy)

“Better have a mouse in the pot than no flesh.” Scottish

“Careless shepherds make many a feast for the wolf.” Chinese?

“Even a mangy sheep is good for a little wool.”

“Every man thinks his own geese swans.” OR “Every mother thinks her own gosling a swan.” Danish or German

“Flies always sit themselves on a thin horse.” [Mennonite Low German from Kansas – the vulnerable are always targeted by predatory people]

“Go to bed with the lamb and rise with the lark.”

“If you want a pretense to whip a dog, say that he ate the frying pan.”

“It is a small flock that has not a black sheep.”

“Man is a wolf to a man.” Roman proverb by Plautus “Homo homini lupus”

“Nightingales will not sing in a cage.”

“No room to swing a cat.” (very tight quarters)

“One man may steal a horse while another may not look over a hedge.” German

Some are chartered libertine while others are always eyed with suspicion

“One might as well be hanged for a sheep as for a lamb.” If you are caught and getting the same punishment, you may as well commit the greater offense

“One scabbed sheep will mar a whole flock.” Danish

“The camel going to seek horns lost his ears.” Latin or Turkish – in seeking to better their condition, they lose the advantages that are at hand.

“The dog barks, but the caravan goes on.” (Persian – indicate the superiority of the great to popular clamour)

“To eat the calf in the cow’s belly.” (Reckon one’s chickens before they are hatched – spending our pregnant hopes before they are delivered)

“To find a mare’s nest.” – (complex and difficult situation or hoax and fraud)

“To give a lark to catch a kite.” (Throw out a minnow to catch a sprat)

“To have rats in the attic.” Danish

“Too much pudding will choke a dog.” (Too much of a good thing)

“To see which way the cat jumps.” (You postpone making a decision until you have seen how things develop)

“To send owls to Athens.” (Greek, similar to “sending coals to Newcastle” – engage in something that is useless)

“Where the horse lies down, there some hair will be found.”

“While the grass grows, the horse starves.” (Dreams or expectations may be realized too late)

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