Posts tagged Dzhambul

“Competence of a Nation” depends on Education

The following thoughts on Education were written by a woman from the Zhambul area, she is about my age.  Consequently, she has witnessed different forms of educating the young people of Kazakhstan over the years, before the fall of the Soviet Union and afterwards. I’m not sure what her sources were, but she has some compelling quotes from the President of this nation concerning education.  Seems to be uppermost in all of our minds these days…

“According to statistics, 1,800,000 school children in Kazakhstan are mastering the English language.  14,500 school teachers are available but they don’t know the requirements of modern life as teachers.  The Ministry of Education and Science of Kazakhstan has asked the government to allocate more funds for attracting foreign specialists to teach English. “Accordingly, my country needs suitable professionals who use the best methods in teaching English, at the same time who are ready for constant changes of the contemporary life.”

“Educational system reforms of my country are setting new tasks before the universities, realization of which is impossible without the most competitive, innovative, qualified instructors who are able to improve study process and who can be in step with the times.”

“In his Message” our President highlights on the role of educational policy for implementing ambitious tasks.  Joining the most competitive fifty countries of the world will be carried out due to human capital which is in the first place created in the sphere of education and bringing up young generation. New educational reforms need administrative employees who are good at leading, managing and regulating courses of educational changes and who are always in great demand as specialists.”

Every teacher in Kazakhstan understands why our President focuses a lot on “contemporary education” with the help of which Kazakhstani specialists will be demanded in the world market.  The question is – how to achieve it? Are our universities ready for training such kind of specialists? Unfortunately, not all of them have the necessary material and technical, financial and intellectual resources to meet the world standards.”

“In Kazkahstan, credit technology system hasn’t been fully launched at universities except several ones, that’s why we face difficulties…we’re short of good management and curriculum development. On the other hand, our President set a huge task before the Kazakhstani people – every citizen must know three languages including English, there should be fast, easy and assessable ways of teaching for different ages…

Comments (6) »

Alyona’s Grandfather Moved Seven Times…

      I would like to write about my grandfather because he is very hard-working person and I am proud of him. His name is Vladimir Tyo. He was born in 1927 in Ryazanovka village, Far East (Eastern part of Russia).

      In 1937 he had migrated to Kyzylorda, Kazakhstan, where he finished school.  He had entered zoological college in 1946 and finished it in 1948. After 3 years of working practice (in 1951) he entered Almaty Zoological Institute. He had married my grandmother Zoya Kim in 1952. She finished a medical college. My grandfather graduated in 1956 and was sent by Institute staff to Kostanay region. This land wasn’t fertile because of rigorous climate. So there were not many people and especially good specialists. My grandfather was appointed and worked there as a Chief cattle-breeding specialist of a farm. He was growing cattle, horses and sheep during eight years. His work was important for the country and people. I respect him for working in hard conditions. I think this experience made him extremely hard-working person.

      My grandparents with my father had moved to Karabalta, Kyrgyzstan, in 1964 where they had been living for ten years. Grandfather liked this place very much because of its warm climate. He is very communicative person, so he learned Kyrgyz language during this period of time. He also speaks Korean and Russian. Despite of his honorable age, he continues studying these three languages.

      In 1974 they moved to Dzhambul region, Kazahstan. Grandfather had been working in the military farm and grandmother had been working as a hospital nurse at tuberculosis sanatorium for six years. Then they moved to Chirchik, Uzbekistan, where grandfather was a manager of the pig farm. My parents had met in Chirchik and migrated to Dzhambul (Taraz), Kazahstan, in 1984. They had married and I was born here in 1985.

      In 1988 grandfather became a pensioner and moved to Taraz. There are a lot of our relatives in this town. Although grandfather is a pensioner, he is working hard almost every day in his kitchen garden. I love him very much.

Leave a comment »

Ainash’s Grandparents Difficult Lives

 

In my life I have seen my grandparents very few times. Moreover, I have not met my first grandmother in this life. We are used to living in the city, but my grandparents lived outside of city. So I have been there only on summer holidays. In spite of this, it was the best holidays of my life because it allowed me to play a lot with nothing else to do. The history of my grandparent’s life is not very well known by me because they did not like to talk about their lives and considered that children don’t need to know about the difficulties of their experiences. I know it only from my mother’s history.

My grandfather’s name was Turmuhambet. He was born in 1919 in Dzhambul city. He was tall, thin, quiet and a very kind person. My grandparent’s family worked on the railway. In the family were two sons and my grandfather was younger. He graduated only seven years at school. After that he went to serve in the armed forces. However, the war came and he began to serve in the regular Army. He served in the regiment, which Iran won in 1941. After 2 years in Tehran held a meeting of the anti-Hitler coalition leaders – there are General Secretary of the Central Committee of CPSU Joseph Stalin, U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Consequently, the city had been completely blocked by troops and special service for three conference days. My grandfather was at that time in those troops. Unfortunately, my grandparent lost his brother in war.

My grandparents became acquainted on Victory Day’s celebration. Thus, my grandfather married my first grandmother. My first grandmother’s name was Kanymkul. She was not tall, but thin and a modest woman. She was born in 1927. My grandparents lived together 31 years. They had 8 children; there are 5 boys and 3 girls. After the war my grandparents moved to the village. My grandfather worked as an accountant and then foreman. He learned the Arabic language and wrote poetry. They have not been published, though. Grandmother was a housewife. She brought up children, supported a house and cared for the livestock. She died at 49 years old. Grandfather married a second time, 8 years later. Her name was Aigan and she was much younger than him. In their life together there were no children. My grandfather died at 85 years old, 2 months after the death of grandmother Aigan. He became ill after the grandmother’s funeral and was never able to recover from this loss. These were difficult times for our family.

In conclusion, I would like to note that grandparents of our generation lived in difficult times. They had many experiences of grief and suffering in protecting the homeland. Currently, there are a few retirees who remain and who served and fought in the Soviet army. Our country cares about them. They are providing incentives and working on social programs for them. But, in my opinion, this is not enough for the elderly, as well as our concern and love brings them more happiness and comfort. We must not stop talking with them and listen to their stories. The main purpose of their life was a peace for their grandchildren. Our main task does not forget history and persons who created this story.

Now I am very sad that I have spoken little with my grandparents about their lives. That gave them little time. But I know that every summer, which I spent with them, brought no less joy.

 

 

Leave a comment »