Posts tagged Aristotle

Global Leadership Summit Notes (Part II)

What a privilege to hear all these speakers from their different areas of expertise talk about leadership. Please see yesterday’s to see what else I learned all the while thinking about education and human trafficking in Kazakhstan.

V. Dr. Henry Cloud – The Wise, the Foolish, the Evil

Truth, what do they do with it?  Reality is different from the assumptions of leaders who think everyone is kind and responsible like them.  Diagnose who you are talking to. There are three categories of people:

1)   wise

2)   fools

3)   evil

For the wise, the light comes and they adjust their eyes to it, they actually adjust themselves when they hear truth.  They tweak the formula if they have to. When they hear criticism, they say thank you with a smile.  When a coach gives feedback they heed it.  Resource them and keep them appropriately challenged.

However, the fool instead adjusts the light, adjusts the truth and is angry when they hear criticism. They change the truth and deny reality.  They shoot the messenger.

There is hopelessness and they don’t own the problem, they blame someone else

“Do not confront or correct a fool, a mocker will hate you.”

With a fool, stop talking to them.  Stop the insanity

They have stopped the plan of your mission because they have an allergy to the reality

Don’t talk about problems with them.  Take your talk to the pattern.  You have to know how to give feedback and set your LIMITS to exposure of the problem in perception.  The leader must protect the vision or the culture of the team

Some fools are living for show or fear reasons

Ask them, “What are we doing if you keep this behavior up?”  There are consequences.

Fools do not change

Limit exposure, clear about consequences, give choice, follow through

Finally, evil people, they are bent on destruction

Reject a divisive person, flee after second warning.  Have nothing to do with them

You may need lawyers, guns (law enforcement to help intervene) and money to protect yourself from evil.

VI. John Dickson, Sydney, Australia

Numbers 12:3 – Moses wrote that he was the most humble man. The word Humility had a different meaning back when Moses wrote that than it does for us in contemporary society.

Humility means To hold power in service of others.  Humility makes the great even greater

Cultivate this in life, five things about humility

1)   common sense – none of us is an expert in everything – a true expert must know that what they don’t know far exceeds what they know in their subject. Must use Competency extrapolation.

2)   beautiful – Sir Edmund Hillary 1919-2008 was the one who climbed Mt. Everest, he built hospitals in Nepal.  He was being photographed by some admirers and some other climbers came along and didn’t know who he was so they straightened out his ice pick he was holding.  He said “thank you.” That was a beautiful expression of humility because of COURSE he knew how to hold a pick but didn’t let on.

3)   Generative – generates new knowledge.  Scientific revolution took off with the idea to test, retest, evaluate with colleagues.  Humility encouraged science. Low place is a place of learning

4)   Persuasive – “On Rhetoric” by Aristotle, he talked of logos, pathos and ethos.  Ethos is the character of a persuader.  Most believable because you have others’ best interests at heart if you have good character.

5)   Inspiring – Collins “Good to Great” – leaders maximize other peoples’ potential, the others are aloof and unapproachable.  Great leaders are approachable, they are humble and other aspire to be like them

Four tools of leadership

1)   ability

2)   authority

3)   character

4)   persuasion

We went through the cruciform of a change at Jesus death.  From the ancient times it was not cool to be humble but rather to be competent and arrogant.  After Jesus death there was a humility revolution.  Thus, when Moses said he was the most humble, it was self-effacing back in his time.  Now we would never admit that we are humble, it is a quality other’s see in us and want.

VII. Patrick (filled in for Howard Shultz from Starbucks) – he wrote “Getting Naked”

We need to be reminded, more than instructed

Ken Blanchard wrote about the power of vulnerability

Manifest humility by being vulnerable

We in the western world try to avoid suffering at all costs but this is counter-cultural to following Christ

Why is it so hard to be vulnerable? Fear of losing business or fear of rejection

“Enter the danger”  Improvisation like in tv show “Whose line is it anyway?”

360 feedback forms

1)   speak kind truth – terminal niceness – don’t be afraid of being rejected

2)   fear of being embarrassed – ask the dumb question, Celebrate our mistakes, acknowledge our humanity

3)   fear of feeling inferior

Do the dirty work, go the second mile service. What did Jesus do? he washed feet

Honoring your clients’ work

Vulnerability which breeds loyalty

Not easy, suffering pain

Answering the call

Don’t get rewarded

Do it anyway when NOT rewarded

VIII. Chasing Daylight – Erwin McManus, film maker, L.A. California

Read from Eccl. 1 – Meaningless…all is meaningless says the teacher (written by King Solomon)

McManus loves Solomon and his transparency when he says “There’s nothing new under the sun.” he doesn’t agree with Solomon though

Is. 43:18-19

There is a creative process.  God is an artist. We are part of the creative order if we are Christians.  All others who are not Christians along with the animals are the created order.

Creative order vs. created order

Some might say, “Let’s make history” and that you can do to leave your mark

Others might say “Let’s change history” which you can’t do unless you are an avowed revisionist

Let’s create the future, that is God’s arena

Evil men don’t ask permission to change the world

Good people sit back and wait for permission to save the world.

McManus was asked what art would look like after the post-modern world.

He replied, “Whatever we choose.”

Why wait for others to choose our future?  Why is Star Wars and Avatar beating out the Christians in art?

Focus on creating future God has in mind

We are to be cultivators of human talent, be a good steward of what we’ve been given

Acts 7

Shakespeare wrote “Others have greatness thrust upon them.”

In schools and life, the extraordinary is beaten out of us.  There are hidden talents

We can be the incubator for those who are creative.  Sometimes dreams are trapped in people’s souls

Human talent and the glory of God

You, even at your best, will never be intimidating to God.

The Christian world used to have the best poets

There is the false narrative

We need to reclaim truth telling power

Revival of great story telling

Truths lost in a bad story

We need to be cultivators of talent, narrators of humor, story, acknowledge the mosaic and the masterful. Do something NEW!!!

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A. Solzhenitszyn in the City of Apostils

“One person speaking the truth has more power than a whole city living in falsehood.”    Aleksandr Solzhenitszyn

 

I am currently living and teaching in the City of Apples or Almaty, Kazakhstan.  Just yesterday I received a rather opaque e-mail where about 20 of us at our “institution of higher learning” need to do some extra paperwork which involves an “apostil.” Many of us wondered, “What is an apostil?”  Not to be confused with apostles or apples, of course.  This e-mail was the second of its kind within a week that I have received which is full of blathering legalese.  Supposedly our university touts itself as being unique and having a “high level of openness and transparency.”  I would agree with Aristotle when he argued that “the only way one can discover the true character of a regime is to analyze in depth the characteristics of its leadership…”

 

 

Reading through the first message, with the help of a friend who has a law degree, I found that the author of the e-mail was making fallacious claims about certain laws concerning the misuse or abuse of our use of electronic research databases.  This person was using a bullying tactic by interpreting the law which had nothing to do with my pedagogy whatsoever.  I have the backing of several in our academic community who understand the use of electronic databases the same way I do.

 

Unfortunately, there are those who are suspicious of the Information or Computer Literacy that has taken over in the West.  No more can you apply for different grants or answer the distant “call for papers” without doing it electronically.  Gone are the days of mailing in your application through the regular postal service, our globalized world is getting smaller thanks to the Internet.

 

So, where is our leadership in protecting foreign faculty who come to the land of apples and apostils?  According to Kazakhstan’s President N.A. Nazarbayev in reference to our university, “Everything here is done to the highest standards, there’s no need to go abroad to study.”   Therefore, we as foreign faculty are making it more affordable to have Kazakhstani students study at our institution rather than have them go abroad to the West and find out that the standard in writing and computer literacy are far higher than earlier suspected.

 

Lately I’ve been reading a very riveting book titled “The Silent Steppe: A Story of a Kazakh Nomad under Stalin.”  Mukhamet Shayakhmetov, is a man in his eighties whom I highly respect as an educator, caring deeply about his country of Kazakhstan.  He wrote the following on page p. 146 “Writing these words now, so many years later, I find myself thinking long and hard about the past.  For years our ancestors lived under a tribal system where relationships were based on mutual help: they were convinced of the enduring worth of their centuries-old principles, and perhaps as a consequence used to regard any innovation with suspicion, fear and even disapproval.  They were conservative by nature and clung to what was familiar: why else, in 1932, when the population of Kazakhstan was in the grip of a terrible famine, did our two families of fugitives head for a starving aul – where a year before they had been robbed, prosecuted and deported – instead of staying in Ridder, where they were getting limited but at least regular food rations?”

 

What would Solzhenitszyn say NOW about Kazakhstan if he were to ever return to this land?  What would he write about our university which requires “apostiled” documentation of their foreign faculty?  Just curious.

 

 

 

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