What if we were given word limits on our thoughts?

This morning my husband and I were talking about the word counts that I am working with on the next book I am writing on my hometown. I have to put 140 words there, then if more important characters come up I can go up to 400 words. Single captions that go with a picture can be anywhere from 50-70 words. Oy, to keep track of introductions to each chapter not being more than 350 words and limit of 10 chapters and, and…

That’s why I thought about word limits or quotas that we might have to use in every day life. Ever thought that we might have to give ourselves limits on what we think?! A message might bleep “Over capacity of thoughts, delete, delete!” or you have used up your quota for the day but someone drops by on you spontaneously. What to do? Use sign language? Write texts? What if your texts are monitored and you can’t do that in order to communicate.

I guess I was thinking about this because I played the game “MAO” with my nephews and niece over the Thanksgiving holiday. My nephew says there are three things that you need to know about this weird card game. 1) there are no rules 2) you have to figure them out as you go 3) Ever played Crazy Eight? No, it is not like that. So, it is rather frustrating when you don’t know what the rule is, the person who is in control of the game is annoying and you just want to throw your hands up with the cards with them and say, “forget it!” and let the cards fall wherever they will. You don’t do that because you are civilized but you really WANT to.

So, there is not much talking in this game because you are penalized for saying something. You also have to find out what the people who are “in the know” do and then follow their cues. I had a Japanese former student come to our place for Thanksgiving and she sat out the first round. She did very well the second round because she is a good observer.

Back to thinking about how word limits to our thoughts might not be all bad. It might show that there are people in this world who never reach their “thought limit” on a daily basis. Perish the thought!

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