Archive for January, 2012

“Courageous” AND who are following these girls?

We watched the movie “Courageous” a second time on New Year’s Eve and the message comes across loud and clear.  All children need daddies who can love and protect them from outside evils. Trafficking is an ever present evil especially when children are targeted. Noteworthy to see the men in the two hour movie take responsibility for not just being “good enough” fathers but also doing their duty of reaching out to other youngsters who have no role model to look up to. They resolved to be exceptional fathers.

Who are following the girls (and boys) in the former Soviet Union with ideas of hurting them for their own financial gain?  Are they reading this blog now? Read yesterday’s blog to find out why I ask these two questions.

What I’m reading about “Stella voice homes” there are too few dads to meet the needs of Orphans in Moldova and perhaps Kazakhstan now.  Please read on about what one man with a HUGE father’s heart wrote:

About Stella’s voice from the founder, Philip Cameron.

“…this fragile girl is an orphan in Europe’s most impoverished country: Moldova.  Though Communism dies here, there are vestiges of that sad mindset still in place. Incredibly, Moldovan orphans are treated as outcasts, common thieves, parasites…though they have done no wrong.  They are rarely encouraged, often ridiculed, all but starved and housed in conditions unspeakable.

In this environment young girls have no self-worth or self-esteem. They think of themselves as forgotten and forever lost.  When you speak with the girls they cannot even define the concept of “hope” though in their language there is a wonderful word for it.

So as the clock ticks away a mere girl of sixteen shivers on her thin cot.  She is hungry but she is used to that as she has gone to bed hungry every night of her life.  But tonight is different.  This is the last time she is allowed to sleep on a cot and take a meal of thin soup.  Soon she will be out on the street with nowhere to go and no one to turn to.  You would think she would be glad to escape an orphan’s misery but this is not the case.  Because she’s heard the rumors and wonders why so many that left before her simply disappeared.

She does not know she’ll likely walk right into the arms of sex trafficking profiteers.  Before being discarded she will become merely a profit center for her perverted captors and their clients in Europe, the Middle East and beyond.

The magnitude of this misery in Moldova is astounding.  Over 450,000 girls have gone “missing.”  Nearly half a million girls have vanished into the night…and as the clock counts down more will join them…”

(to be continued)

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Who is following this blog…and why?

WordPress has done an amazing thing by sending out an annual report to their bloggers of some of their personal statistics for 2011.  What is interesting can be somewhat unsettling as well.  Who is really following my blog and WHY?  Since I returned home to the U.S. after 3 1/2 years of writing every day on this blog about Kazakhstan, I blogged sporadically so thus I only had 164 new posts for 2011. (I’ve dedicated this blog now to mostly human trafficking issues) In total I have written 1,334 new posts since the fall of 2007.  My busiest day was May 19th with 349 hits, a record high for me for this year.  Otherwise, I have been straddling around 100 or 150 on average for most of this year of 2011.

Here’s what I find troubling, the top key word searches were “Kazakhstan girls” or “Kazakh girls.”  That happened several years ago when I had innocently titled a blog “Little Girl in Pink.” LOTS of hits on that one blog entry where I finally took the photo of the young Kazakh girl down.  I believe there are some strange viewers out there who have wrong motives for wanting to see these girls. Maybe these viewers move on to other sites that show lewd pictures of girls and I mean young girls. Apparently trafficked girls in the U.S. get started as young as 13 years old on average. According to Steve Graham from Australia (CEO of ACT) there are 1.2 million children trafficked every year throughout the world.

Here’s the breakdown of who is following this blog and from different continents.  Europe actually includes Kazakhstan in its statistics which I find amusing:

Europe: 17% United Kingdom, 13% Kazakhstan, 8% Turkey, 7% Germany, 6% Poland

North America: 90% U.S. 9% Canada (I know who my Canadian follower is) The others from the U.S. I’m not sure who they are but hopefully friends and family

Africa: Ghana 23% (I know who that American follower is), Morocco 17%, South Africa 14%, Egypt 13% and Algeria 6%

South America: Brazil 46%, Argentina 18% (other countries but too fragmented to mention)

Oceania: Australia 81%, New Zealand 15%

Asia: Philippines 24%, India 15%, United Arab Emirates 8%, Malaysia 7%, Pakistan 4%

Asia has me most confounded, why isn’t China included in these statistics?  Is it because the Chinese are not allowed to have WordPress or even have any blogging?  I would expect North Korea to not have a showing but why not Korea? My biggest WHY is how come the Philippines so high? They have a very literate population in English, as does India.  I can understand why Australia is so high, I just have a new follower (mentioned above) who heads up ACT (Against Child Trafficking). I also have friends I have met over the years from Australia and New Zealand.

To me this was interesting to speculate on and tomorrow I will write more about Stella’s Voice.  It is something that I hope would start up in Kazakhstan. Children who are released out of Kazakh orphanages because they are “grown up” at the tender age of 16 or 18, I can’t remember which, are to fend for themselves. Traffickers know how to pick them off very easily because they are so vulnerable. What I read about the situation in Moldova was horrifying.

(to be continued)

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