Professionals vs. Victims in Human Trafficking (Part VIII)

Okay, THIS is finally the very last essay written by one of my former Kazakh students after they read the book “Two Kyrgyz Women.”  This student did a wonderful job of showing the distinctions of those who are prostitutes of their own volition and those who are kidnapped and forced into this occupation.  The emotional trauma that is culturally in place for these victims if they were to ever return home is very much against them.  The whole Central Asian way of thinking would have to shift to not blame the victim but rather to go after the customers (Johns) and especially the traffickers.  Read what this astute student wrote:

Human trafficking is a very huge problem nowadays. It is spread all over the world and Kazakhstan is not the exception. As I am a woman myself, I am concerned of sexual human trafficking for many Central Asian women become victims of this crime. Even though sexual human trafficking is one of the most complicated crimes as it is hard to find those who are to be blamed, we can decrease the number of the victims by educating women and girls and changing the attitude of the society.

Sexual human trafficking is one of the most complicated crimes as it is hard to find those who are to be blamed. When speaking about this crime, we cannot distinguish whether the women engaged in it are victims or not.

First, there are women who know what they do and become prostitutes at their own will. That can be proved by the case of Adele which was described in the second part of “Two Kyrgyz Women”. She knew what her lot would be when she went to Dubai.

Second, there are cases when women were kidnapped, they did not want to be prostitutes but they had to because they were forced to. But when the time passed they got used to their position and rather preferred to continue working than to return home where there was nothing but hungry children or a drunk husband or both. This case was described in the second part of “Two Kyrgyz Women” when the women persuaded Gulya to resign herself as they did. They said it was not so bad after all.

The above described cases illustrate that it is hard to differentiate between real victims and those who undertake their “work” at their own will.

We can decrease the number of the victims by educating women and girls, giving them information because information is one of the most important weapons in fighting sexual human trafficking. And the author of “Two Kyrgyz Women” Marinca Franulovic made a good work having written the book about poor women.

Next, we should try to change the attitude of the society towards the victims of this crime. Sometimes women are afraid of telling the truth even to their parents! That’s why we do not know the real number of the human trafficking victims. We should change out attitude because it is not the victims who are to be blamed but those who use their service and who use them.

In conclusion, I can believe that we can fight human trafficking when being a whole nation we fight it together.

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