Photos of my friends left behind (Part II)

My long flight(s) home with three pieces of luggage and one carryon was meant to carry back three and a half years worth of accumulation for both my husband and me. I paid Lufthansa $170 for the third piece and was happy that I did not have to pay Delta airlines again in Chicago another $180 for penalty of three suitcases.  I was happy that there were people who helped me all along the way. I felt like they were angels on a mission. I was especially glad my husband was there at the Minneapolis airport to carry my heavy carryon and take me to our car where it was filled with precious things from Kazakhstan. We still had a five hour trip of driving ahead of us so I didn’t get home until 2 1/2 days later. (stayed overnight with friends about an hour out of the Cities)  The past week was less torturous because of amazing friends all along the way. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! I’ve said goodbye to some very precious friends in Astana, Kazakhstan so for now less words and MORE photos of those I left behind.

7 Responses so far »

  1. 1

    We are missing you so much!!!!
    We have started our critical thinking courses and after the first seminar I cannot say that I learned much. Everything was rather familiar. Everything was taught by you! I wish you’ll be back!!!

  2. 2

    Gulsana said,

    That is so sad you left KZ. I was still considering to meet you in Astana. However, I thank you again for the great blog that you have created and gave us an insight about a Westerner’s perspective about our country.
    In the meantime, I have found this article in The Economics magazine which left me questioning the accuracy of their survey.
    http://www.economist.com/blogs/johnson/2011/04/english
    I still think that Kazakhs learn languages pretty good,(the only thing I have noticed that many of us struggle with the articles, including me:(…) and Turkey? Whenever I am in Turkey, everyone seems to speak fluent English. I think the survey is a bit twisted. And I wonder if they took into consideration our small population size?
    How do you think?

    P.S. Please, keep us updated on your life in the US:)

    Best,
    Gulsana

    • 3

      kazaknomad said,

      Thanks for the link to the Economist article about English speaking nations. You are right, KZ doesn’t look so good but it could be because the teachers of English are not equipped with the latest in methods and technology. Therefore those who did have the money to have their own computers to take the survey on-line have not been properly trained in English. There is the confounding factor of three language policy which the Scandinavian countries don’t have to concern themselves with. Yes, I have paused on writing about KZ because I’m not there but home in the U.S. perhaps if I am to return, I will pick up where I left off.

  3. 4

    Батырхан said,

    The pics and your words translate how heart-broken you were to leave… 🙂

  4. 5

    kazaknomad said,

    Four months later, as I read your comment, I still am caught up short emotionally with how heartbroken I was to leave Kazakhstan. How sad it was for me and my students because of some of the people and circumstances I had to leave. BUT because of other precious Kazakh people, I didn’t want to go. Will I ever see them again? Maybe not.

    • 6

      batirkhan said,

      I am so sorry to hear about those unfortunate circumstances… Well, I would like to thank you for your years of honest diligent wholehearted service to the young people of Kazakhstan. I hope that may be one day you would be back, you are doing an AMAZING service to our country by this blog as well. Kop-kop rahmet sizge!!!

  5. 7

    kazaknomad said,

    Thanks Batirkhan, it has been fun writing back and forth with you about a country and its people which holds a VERY dear place in my heart. Yes, I do hope that I will be able to return to see my Kazakh friends and former students. This blog will have to do for now (and thank God for Facebook!) Through others’ eyes and what they write, I will continue to witness the steady progress this young (simultaneously old) nation will have accomplished in my absence. God willing, I WILL return!


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