Posts tagged human trafficking

Five things to know about human trafficking

As your typical composition teacher, I have the proverbial stack of papers about human trafficking that I need to grade before tomorrow’s classes. Thirty-five for tomorrow and 15 more for Thursday are due BACK to the students with my corrections.  I am distracting myself with updating my WordPress account with this new posting.  I have been remiss in writing because I have been so busy staying ahead of my students.  I can see the light at the end of the tunnel, we only have about five weeks left before they will be giving their ppt presentations to go with their research papers.  Thankfully I am having them write a persuasive research paper on something they choose to write on, with my approval, of course.

The following is something I found in an old folder and relates to the tough things I need to be reading from my students’ papers.  It IS a reality that is so far removed from our university setting…yet we are part of the problem when we remain unaware of other people’s suffering.  One thing I had shown a part of was a clip off of YouTube titled “Dark Side of Chocolate.”  Unfortunately, I did not share what a reporter from CNN, Amanda Kloer had written about “5 things to know about human trafficking:”

Editor’s Note: Amanda Kloer is an editor with Change.org, where she organizes and promotes campaigns to end human trafficking. She has created numerous reports, documentaries and training materials on human trafficking in the United States and around the world.

Human trafficking might not be something we think about on a daily basis, but this crime affects the communities where we live, the products which we buy and the people who we care about. Want to learn more? Here are the five most important things to know about human trafficking:

  1. Human trafficking is slavery.

Human trafficking is modern-day slavery. It involves one person controlling another and exploiting him or her for work. Like historical slavery, human trafficking is a business that generates billions of dollars a year. But unlike historical slavery, human trafficking is not legal anywhere in the world. Instead of being held by law, victims are trapped physically, psychologically, financially or emotionally by their traffickers.

  1. It’s happening where you live.

Stories about human trafficking are often set in far-away places, like cities in Cambodia, small towns in Moldova, or rural parts of Brazil. But human trafficking happens in cities and towns all over the world, including in the United States. Enslaved farmworkers have been found harvesting tomatoes in Florida and picking strawberries in California. Young girls have been forced into prostitution in Toledo, Atlanta, Wichita, Los Angeles, and other cities and towns across America. Women have been enslaved as domestic workers in homes in Maryland and New York. And human trafficking victims have been found working in restaurants, hotels, nail salons, and shops in small towns and booming cities. Wherever you live, chances are some form of human trafficking has taken place there.

  1. It’s happening to people just like you.

Human trafficking doesn’t discriminate on the basis of race, age, gender, or religion. Anyone can be a victim. Most of the human trafficking victims in the world are female and under 18, but men and older adults can be trafficking victims too. While poverty, lack of education, and belonging to a marginalized group are all factors that increase risk of trafficking, victims of modern-day slavery have included children from middle-class families, women with college degrees, and people from dominant religious or ethnic groups.

  1. Products you eat, wear, and use every day may have been made by human trafficking victims.

Human trafficking isn’t just in your town – it’s in your home, since human trafficking victims are forced to make many of the products we use everyday, according to ProductsofSlavery.org. If your kitchen is stocked with rice, chocolate, fresh produce, fish, or coffee, those edibles might have been harvested by trafficking victims. If you’re wearing gold jewelry, athletic shoes, or cotton underwear, you might be wearing something made by slaves. And if your home contains a rug, a soccer ball, fresh flowers, a cell phone, or Christmas decorations, then slavery is quite possibly in your house. Human trafficking in the production of consumer goods is so widespread, most people in America have worn, touched, or consumed a product of slavery at some point.

  1. We can stop human trafficking in our lifetime.

The good news is not only that we can end human trafficking around the world, we can end it within a generation. But to achieve that goal, everyone needs to work together. Already, activists around the world are launching and winning campaigns to hold governments and companies accountable for human trafficking, create better laws, and prevent trafficking in their communities. You can start a campaign on Change.org to fight trafficking in your community. You can also fight trafficking by buying from companies that have transparent and slave-free supply chains, volunteering for or donating to organizations fighting trafficking, and talking to your friends and family about the issue. Together, we can fight human trafficking … and win.

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Entitlement, Victim Mentality vs. Responsible Accountability

I just finished having an hour long conversation with a very sensitive coordinator who got some negative feedback from a high school teacher about my rating of their students’ writings. I don’t know who these students are, they don’t know who I am. Everything is anonymous and usually that is good, right? The teacher gets involved when the students feel hurt about the feedback I give. For instance, I may give a student a poor rating because their writing is not up to the level it should be. I am an outside, objective person who doesn’t know what the exact assignment requirements are, however, I DO know what a good essay should look like and read like. Then, I am finding out, when I give a negative on the writing it reflects poorly on the teacher.

Therefore, I have had the support of my coordinator thus far. He knows my work and appreciates what I write for feedback. However, he had to tell me that I have to curb my comments on the students’ ideas because I might be stepping on their toes. Some of them might be feeling down already and NOT confident in their writing abilities. Others, however, might be feeling over-confident in their writing skills. I told my boss that in some cases I see that the students are being passed on through and are ill prepared to go on to college. The high school writing teachers are overburdened with much pressure to succeed. I can only empathize with the teachers who are expected to perform well in getting the high school students up to a certain standard.

In my case, I wrote feedback challenging their thinking so that they would actively think about other perspectives. I KNOW some of them are just receiving the cookie cutter way of thinking and narrow scope. Whereas, I bring out my globalized thinking when it comes to human trafficking. It is an awful topic to explore but I believe it is something that the students need to think about and not how blacks were treated unfairly in ALL cases. This creates the entitlement attitude and also perpetuates the victim mentality. I am flummoxed why this has to be discussed when what is a present day problem is swept under the rug.

Suffice it to say, I have been reprimanded in a very kind way. I have gotten feedback from a stressed out composition teacher that she believes that I have a racist agenda. She is accusing me of things that are not true and is defending her students, they are theater types and probably the touchy feely types. Anyway, I think students need to learn these days about being accountable and responsible. They are not getting that lesson if they are whining about the rater’s score which is low. I don’t know, I think I will let this slide off my back. The coordinator thought I would be wounded by this. I was not. I pity the teacher, they are going through a difficult time trying to teach these kids to write better. I’ve been there and done that!

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Giving a Talk on H.T. Issues…Again

Recently I was asked by someone I know from my hometown, through Facebook, if I still give talks on human trafficking issues.  What evolved from my affirmative answer was a whirlwind of phone conversations on her end to get me to be the speaker to 20-30 people in one month. (my guess is their other featured speaker must have cancelled on them at the last minute)  On my end I wrote the following to convince the promoters of this event and eventually the audience participants that I mean business.  I will be paid by some federal grant for my gas mileage, hotel and meals and speaker’s fee.  I hope that I can do this two day conference justice. Surely they have many speakers in the Twin Cities who can talk on this subject rather than getting me from five hours away.

In any case, I will go and do the best I can in 90 minutes to convince those in attendance that this is a plague amongst all of us throughout the whole world. Not only domestic abuse and violence against women, but men and children are also enslaved. That is my main message. Slavery and using humans is an age old and troubling problem that has been with us for thousands of years. Wherever you have the powerful and dominating culture, you will also have the vulnerable and weak. Those in the middle need to rise up and do something about helping those who can’t help themselves. The abolitionists did it before with changing laws and trends, people like Wilberforce, worked within his sphere of influence.  Surely we can do the same.  Here is what I quick wrote based on what I had written earlier on this blog.  My eyes had been opened up to this tragedy of human trafficking after living three plus years in Kazakhstan. For some inexplicable reason, this dreadful topic will not go away for me. I need to stay on the front lines to help in the fight.

“Modern-day traders in human property know their business inside out and respond to changes in the market with a speed unmatched by even the most competitive corporations.  Their expertise and ability to exploit the market are surpassed only by their disregard for human life. Women are bought, sold and hired out like any other product. The bottom line is profit.”

We, as westerners, should NOT be complacent about human trafficking. I have seen with my own eyes the slavery mentality in countries I have lived in or visited from the Philippines, China, Hong Kong, to the countries of the former Soviet Union of Ukraine, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan. I have lived 15 years outside of my own country to know that human trafficking exists and is getting worse than ever. Maybe out of willful ignorance we do not care to know about those trapped in sex trafficking who need an outside advocate. Maybe it is because we think slavery was abolished since our “Civil” War in America, that it doesn’t exist elsewhere in the world? It does exist and the numbers of trafficked victims far exceed the total number of slaves during the hundreds of years of the trans-Atlantic trade from Africa to the U.S. My main question is: “Shouldn’t there be an all-out war and campaign against human trafficking?”

My answer as an educator is that I am convinced when people are presented the facts about human trafficking, they respond in wanting to help or donate in some way to alleviate the suffering.  We must admit that we live in a privileged, first world environment that is comfortable while many languish in poverty and grab at any opportunity that will possibly help them out.  In my presentations that I give about human trafficking, I set forth some of the things I have learned along the way about child soldiers, child labor, building construction, tobacco/cotton fields, begging in streets, forced marriages, surrogate maternity, harvesting organs, pornography and prostitution. Whoever listens to what I have learned, will come away knowing that this is not just a war against women but men and children as well.  They will also find out there is hope because there are international organizations (i.e. Polaris Project, Freeset, Remember Nu, Not for Sale, etc.) which are mobilized to do something about trafficking.  We are NOT alone in this fight against human trafficking.

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Student’s Paper on “Half the Sky” and more (Part II)

A continuation from yesterday’s blog about sex slavery and how education can help to eradicate the problem. I am saved by my students’ papers that took on this tough topic of human trafficking.  Marcus read the book “Half the Sky.”  I am doing other writing about my hometown, thus, I am not using my own words to write in this blog.  I have other students’ papers that need a little editting but continue on the same theme of human trafficking.

“There is a cynical belief on whether support groups are actually benefitting the victims in need of assistance. These beliefs are aided by the continuous rise and fall of organizations trying to make changes in struggling societies. To the general society (people provided only with information given from commercials) are brought to confusion of what is actually happening on the other side of the earth. In these organizations defense, the reason for some of them having troubles and falling out of operation is because their initial plans of helping these societies in scope did not pan out to their expectations. In WuDunn’s (2010) chapter Investing in Education, it explains how aid from outside sources to help an inner society problem can have many issues. Since it is highly likely that outside sources would not have the same knowledge of the situation as the locals, oversights on solutions would not be uncommon. In parts of Nigeria, women would raise cassava (a widely eaten root, similar to the use of a potato) and use it as a household food, selling the surplus to local markets controlling the money earned from the sales. The organization at the time in Nigeria, were looking for ways that women could attain a stronger in society. Having this opportunity their idea was as followed: “If we give them better varieties of cassava, they’ll harvest more and sell more. Then they’ll make more money, and spend it on their families.” What was overlooked was that with the increase in cassava grown, there were not enough women to manage the entire harvest, leaving much of the leftovers unattended. This led to problems between the men and women in these communities. The increased profit from the cassava attracted men into the equation having the idea that since it was generating so much money, it should be a “man’s job.” This brought social-domestic issues by pushing women out of a situation that gave them some stability in society. Overall there can be issues that can have negative effects if both sides of the outcome are not first comprehended, but not all situations have the same outcome. Most successful aid from outside organizations has the local government somewhat involved. With this involvement, the government has the opportunity to maintain the positive planning that is being implemented so that it can manage in society without constant aid from support groups.

An example of a successful plan came from the consensus decision of the Mexican government. They launched a study called Oportunidades which is a conditional cash transfer (CCT) program that offers cash and in-kind services to poor households as incentives for households to invest more in their children’s health and education (Todd & Winters, 2011). Most families in impoverish situations do not have thoughts of enrolling their children in early education or even regular education because of either financial or lifestyle issues (children having to work to provide for family). Along with education, families rarely have the opportunity to be medically treated or go for treatment if it is available. With these lifestyle choices from the influence of poverty, any income that was in the family’s possession first went to survival needs such as food and supplies. Oportunidades was established to break the reoccurring trend of impoverished families and provide them with chances for an optimistic future. The program incentive was to encourage parents of families to create healthy habits of going on regular medical check-ups in addition to implementing their children to “on-time” schooling (the child starting school at approximately 6 years of age). Since the government was the main source backing the program (starting with small communities as a control group) as well as their tactics (CCT) the overall plan flourished. Having the CCT implemented it influence households to abide by the guidelines of the program on their own time. In result it provided the households to create habits on their own just as a baby is weaned off the mother’s breast to a bottle and then onto a cup. This gave families and specifically children a chance to improve their lives for the future. Parents would learn positive habits to pass down to their children who are now living healthier lives. The children being able to partake in academics at an internationally acceptable age have a higher chance of attaining respectable jobs globally which in turn can influence their communities in an economically positive way.

Having communities uplifted from poverty can create a more positive balance of how each person in the world is valued. Another quote from WuDunn’s (2010) book provides the emphasis of separation between societies:

The officer shrugged, unperturbed. “It’s unfortunate,” he agreed. “These girls are sacrificed so that we can have harmony in society. So that good girls can be safe.”

“But many of the Nepali girls are good girls, too.”

“Oh yes, but those are peasant girls. They can’t even read. They’re from the countryside. The good Indian middle-class girls are safe.”

These distinctive separations of value between people that have an education and are brought up in a middle-class society have disposed of the people of opposite benefits. The main issue is that the people in poverty have no chance of breaking out of that struggle without aid. They will continue to be left in the shadows hidden away from the rest of society if society is content with the idea. Now this is not true in all parts of the country, but it is equally wrong to avoid taking action on the countries that are allowing for these illegal events to occur. Being in a country that has higher standards of living does give off powerful influences to developing countries or countries that want to rise into a well-known society. There needs to be this mindset when dealing with social issues such as sex trafficking to influence powerful groups and governments to make changes within their communities so that no one is left behind. In order for many of these pushes to happen, the communities of these more powerful countries need to be aware of what is happening around the world and are accumulatively ready to back up their country to provide help to others. The most popular source of information has been from media distribution such as YouTube (personal uploaded videos with infinite subjects) and that of regular occurrence (television, newspaper, radio). With these sources, there would be a better chance of bringing communities together to create change and movements. There have always been movements such as “Free the Children”, “Stop Global Warming”, or “Sea-Thos” that have had the public come together to help a cause. All that is needed is for the next cause to be focused on human trafficking. Finding a solution to invest in impoverished communities so that children can have healthy lives and be educated can eliminate the possibility of being victimized by human trafficking.

So although in a few cases of prostitution it may be financially beneficial for families in impoverished countries, sex trafficking of young girls should be abolished. Investment into their education would protect their future and would not bring them to harm psychologically or physically. First of all, most girls deal with unimaginable terror every day from deceived promises of well-paying jobs to be beaten physically and psychologically by their captors or customers. But most importantly, it negates their chance of attaining an education to have a positive future for them and for the community they live in. For these possibilities to even happen, drastic moves need to be made by higher powers to change the ongoing circle of poverty that traps these communities of a lower lifestyle. That being said, the media is a perfect tool to provide help so that support groups can collaborate with governments of developing countries or struggling countries to provide aid to their societies. With this aid just as the Mexican government’s Oportunidades program, it can give these communities the tools to become equal in society and not left in the shadows to be forgotten about. So the real question is if the value of one’s education is so valuable to a middle-class person, it should be just as valuable to a person hoping to have the same chance at their own education.”

Reference

Basil, N. M. (2009). Factors sustaining human trafficking in the contemporary society:

Psychological implications. Ife Psychologia, 17(1), 161-175. Retrieved from Proquest.

doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-232

Jones, L., Engstrom, D., Hilliard, P., & Sungakawan, D. (2011). Human trafficking between

Thailand and Japan: Lessons in recruitment, transit and control. International Journal Of

            Social Welfare, 20(2), 203-211. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2397.2009.00669.x

Ostrovschi, N. V., Prince, M. J., Zimmerman, C., Hotineanu, M. A., Gorceag, L. T., Gorceag, V.

I., Flach, C., & Abas, M. A. (2011). Women in post-trafficking services in Moldova:

Diagnostic interviews over two time periods to assess returning women’s mental

health. BMC Public Health, 11(1), 232-240. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-11-232

Todd, J. E., & Winters, P. (2011). The effect of early interventions in health and nutrition

on on-time school enrollment: Evidence from the oportunidades program in rural

Mexico. Economic Development & Cultural Change, 59(3), 549-581.

WuDunn, S., (2010, August). Sheryl WuDunn: Our century’s greatest injustice. [Video file].

Retrieved from

WuDunn, S., & Kristof, N. D. (2010). Half the sky: Turning oppression into opportunity for

women worldwide. New York: Vintage Books.

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Students’ Perspectives on Human Trafficking

SunriseI realize I haven’t written much lately on this blog.  Gardening, spring cleaning, writing newspaper articles, the list is endless concerning what has distracted me from blogging more. Clearly I am not living in Kazakhstan anymore so I can’t write too much about Kazakh students. However, I am still working with Asian students so I feel right at home in my own hometown in Minnesota.  I will get more on track with writing during this summer in anticipation of next fall and teaching incoming freshmen students.

For now, here are the perspectives from my last class on an assignment I gave them about human trafficking. Most of these are Korean students from my Comp I class, some have English names which helps me as their teacher to call on them in class.

Perspectives on Human trafficking Assignment

Marcus – The thing I liked most about writing this paper was learning a completely new topic that I did not know before. I was never fully aware of the conflicts of human trafficking until I researched my topic of human sex trafficking.  The thing I liked most about this paper was that it built my perspective on life and how we should appreciate the things we take for granted. There are many people in this world that deal with daily struggles that we cannot even fathom. From this I am motivated to better myself so I can in return help others in the future.

Ju Young – Actually I like the most about Human Trafficking issue. I have heard about it before but I didn’t know exactly what the Human Trafficking is and how it is severe recent days. After I finished my Paper#3, I had a lots of chance to think about human trafficking and I tried to help them by UNICEF by monthly donation for an Indian girl ( I can’t remember her name..). Above all now I have lots of thinking about human trafficking and maybe in the future, I will help them and I would say that my helping is from the writing of this assignment.

I think I have learned about this paper is how humans are worthy. Sometimes I thought that my life is sad and why I am in the hard society? Such as hard to entering school in Korea, I have to go to military. But after I did my paper on human trafficking, my thinking was totally changing. I was surprised at too much people are struggling with their tough life and they need a lot of help from me and us. From the doing this paper,  Not only for changing my life and thinking, but I have a broaden sight for looking around me and helping them.

Hayden – Human trafficking is rather quite disturbing topic. Child soliders was my topic and through my research, I found out there are so many children who are in need of help. What I liked about this assignment is that I was glad to see that, around the world, there are people who are trying to reach out their hands to those forsaken children and strive to aid them. Basically, what I learned from writing this paper is that there are children who need help so much and the dark side of the world is just abhorring.

Janet – In this paper, I really like researching about the topic. Since I have been interested in human issues such as human trafficking. So, I really enjoyed researching about this topic. For me, I love the topic- online child pornography-in this paper. During the last topic of human trafficking issue, I really have interested in this issue. So, I choose this topic.

Calvin – Researching and finding information on the topic was not so much fun but informative and I enjoyed that part of the paper.  The troubles of others are unimaginable to those who don’t seek the truth.

Joe – Actually, this topic about human trafficking was too difficult for me to write. The topic was touchy one. However I learned about prostitution especially Asian prostitution more.

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Students’ Reactions to “The City Bleeds Red” blog

bloodAn American girl wrote on her blog about her travels around the world for almost one year.  I had my composition students read her blog if they wanted to write their reaction to it for extra credit. Only three guys from Korea chose to do so. Otherwise, there were books to read on line, articles to look at or my own blogs to reflect on in preparation for their third paper on human trafficking. They looked at this link, I invite you to do the same and then react by adding a comment of your own at the end of this blog entry.

Reactions to “The City Bleeds Red”

Student #1 – This blog entry is by far the most convincing and heart-breaking story I have ever read. Because of this essay I have to reconsider whether the color red is really representing the word ‘passion’ , not, as the article said, “young children having to sit under a bed while their mother is doing “business”. Red is the color of innocence being taken by force, trafficked into new lands and robbed of all hope and future. Red – the color of parentless children being raised by pimps just waiting for them to get to the proper age so they can be put into business. Red – the color of corruption; police being paid every week by pimps so they don’t take action. Red is the color of deception, mistrust and injustice”. This was very touching and really moving paragraph. The whole essay tells what is going on within India. And I feel such pity for those young girls as their freedom, wills, visions, and dreams are shattered by the pimps or other disgusting people. I had no idea that India was in this much trouble with CSWs (Commercial Sex Workers) and other sex traffics. This article really awakened me and bought my attention to India. I think people in India really need help and I am eager to do something about it.

Student #2 – “This city bleeds red.” This sentence is very striking expression that depicts the sad reality of the city. Most of CSW have to have body relationship with 13-15 customers a day, and they get paid $2 per customer. As a result, their appearance looks older than their age and they get a disease. What the horrible reality! Their life and human rights is brutally being trampled underfoot by the minority wicked people. These facts always make me upset, however, there is no apparent solution. So, Katy Westrom and her co-workers always pray for improving poor people and children’s life. The victims of human trafficking need to real love and pray, not crude helps. Therefore, I really respect Katy and her people.

Student #3 – In this writing, the writer describes the Mumbai’s situation a red color that is negative part. In Mumbai, really a lot of commercial sex workers (15000~20000). And they even do their sex work about 13-15 customers a day and only got the $ 2 USD. I am really glad how I am one of the luckiest guys in the world. During the blog review, I realized really a lot of people are suffering from human trafficking especially prostitution. When they as victims suffer from the human trafficking, their life is completely ruined. For example, in this writing, there is a woman who is 35 years old but has both HIV and Tuberculosis. However, she looked like she was 75 years old…and she is not the only one woman who suffered from severe human trafficking. In Mumbai, more than 200,000 women are CSW’s. I felt how their life is so difficult as well. However, when there is a negative part, there also a positive part exists. Now the house where the writer was working used to be a brothel, but now today it is a safe place for children. Also like the writer of this blog, we don’t have a lot of work but love. Pray for them, Pray for their life is a one way to reduce their difficult life.

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Slaves Freed from Brick Factories in India

I had my composition students watch the trailer of the documentary “Dark Side of Chocolate” yesterday. I am happy that the full 45 minutes is up on YouTube.  I also had them watch a Ted.com video of Sheryl WuDuun talk about what she knows of human trafficking.  She and her husband Nicolas Kristof co-authored a book titled “Half the Sky.” Both clips certinaly got the attention of my students.  The following should stir the students’ blood after reading this latest blog from IJM (Intl. Justice Mission). I have seen similar stories or read somewhere about the brick factories in India and how people are tricked into working there…very sad!

IJM Bangalore: A Runaway Brother’s Call For Help Brings Rescue

Fri, 03/01/2013

IJM Bangalore helped rescue the children trapped in forced labor slavery
The siblings were enslaved in a brick kiln outside Bangalore, far from their home village in a neighboring state.

BANGALORE, INDIA – This week, a family of six was set free from slavery in an Indian brick kiln. Over the last couple of weeks, several of the siblings had escaped, making the brick kiln all the more dangerous for those who were left behind.

Tricked Once, Trapped For Good

On February 11 2013, IJM Bangalore got a desperate call for help. The caller was a young man named Prasham.* Prasham had escaped from a brick kiln where he and his siblings had been held captive for about six months.

Prasham relayed a terrible story. The three brothers and their sister were lured into the brick kiln with a hefty advance – a large amount of money that was more than their family had ever dreamed of. The siblings agreed to repay it through their work, but when they arrived they quickly realized they had been tricked. They were paid pennies for their work – about $5 a week. They were trapped.

The labor intensive process of baking clay bricks under the hot sun was back-breaking. Prasham told of a time when his sister was sick, and yet the owner forced her to keep working. He said one of the owner’s men, a watchman, beat his sister, and threatened Prasham when he tried to stand up for her.

Prasham said that the brick kiln owner let the brothers and sister take a short leave in January, to go home for an important Indian holiday. When the siblings didn’t return to the kiln, the owner traveled to their village to track them down. Prasham and his sister successfully hid themselves, but his little brothers, 9 and 13, were taken by the owner.

The two young boys were locked up in a small shed every night, let out only to work. They were forced to work even if they were sick, and if they spoke of illness they were kicked. But somehow, the boys managed to escape.

Two Brothers Escape, Another Held Hostage

At the end of February, IJM learned that situation in the brick kiln had worsened. The brick kiln owner allegedly went to a nearby brick kiln and kidnapped Prasham’s older brother. The brash owner locked them up and threatened to keep them hostage until Prasham and his brothers returned. Prasham said that the owner and his managers called him, telling him that they would “break my brother’s hands and legs if we don’t return back to the brick kiln.”

IJM moved quickly and took the case to the government official who has the authority and responsibility to root out forced labor slavery in his district. Within two days, on February 26, 2013, IJM staff and government officials were en route to the brick kiln.

The brick kiln owner at first denied that he was harboring Prasham’s older brother. But when the government official leading the operation demanded that the owner produce the young man at once, the owner changed his story. The owner said the young man was on his way back to the brick kiln. But the IJM and government rescue team found the young man on the road, being led away from the kiln.

Freedom At Last

The government official heard the stories from all of the brothers and sister, including the older brother who had been locked up for two days. The official determined that all six deserved release certificates, legal documents that declare them free and entitle them to certain government benefits.

A police report was also filed, to ensure the siblings remain safe while evidence is collected to build a case against the brick kiln owner.

An IJM social worker escorted the family back to their village, in the neighboring state, and they will now join IJM’s aftercare program. IJM will follow up to make sure they remain safe and are able to restart their lives in freedom by getting back to school or finding good jobs.

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